TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 76 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In this day of the latest and greatest of everything I have a certain love for what I call "working man" guns and knives. Knives and guns that a man who worked for a wage and raised a family might own or hope to own. The old Harrington and Richardson and High Standard revolvers. The Imperial and Utica "sportsman" style knives. Today many guns cost as much as some of those men would make in several months. Today the "affordable" guns and knives are frequently not worth their modest price. These were the guns and knives I remember from my youth, the users and the get it done tools. People around here had lived through the Great Depression, they knew the value of a dollar. I don't remember people spending much time comparing their knives and guns, and the concept of "run what ya brung" was the rule of the day. You used what you had and could afford and need make no apology to any man.



View attachment 12984 View attachment 12985
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
Borneo I loved those old guns too. My dad had a couple nice firearms from that era and I used to love to shoot them. He had an old H&R Handi Rifle in .410 but my favorite was a High Standard Double Nine Convertible revolver that had a .22 LR and .22 Mag cylinder that you could switch between. Good memories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
While I appreciate their simplicity, I never got used to the "high in the tang" grips of revolvers. The advantages of a semi auto clearly outweight the disadvantages of their complication (at least for me).

I find the most cost effective approach is to have one pistol that you train with and use exclusively. Having a collection would be fun, but for carry usage it is best to focus on one. They are mostly good for fighting your way back to your rifle. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Great Eastern Cutlery still makes the "sportsman" styled knives, like the ones you could buy down at the local hardware store. Cost more than a few bucks now, but still made in 'Merica. I haven't run across any other US manufacturer that still makes this classic style. (and if you know of one...yes, I do want to know). Here are two. And if you are wondering, they are carbon blades and I did patina them.

View attachment 12994
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
789 Posts
I grew up working cattle and a .22 revolver was the choice, dependable even when riding in saddlebags or toolbox
and used rather infrequently. Cost being the biggest issue, anything larger in caliber was too expensive for ammo.
Short barrels were shunned as range was innecffective. .22 ammo weighed considerably less
and took up less space too. Long guns were .410 shotguns, ,22 and occaisionaly a 30-30 lever action.
Everyone coveted the .410 under .22 over for it's practicality. In that era, 70's and 80's a big folding
knife in a sheath was standard a Buck or Old Timer. Course those days everyone had their name
on the back of the big buckcled belt too.....most folk I know these days use a leatherman
type. Times have changed most cattle operations don't even use horses anymore and
the only the wealthy can afford to run cattle and most are making money with real estate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,421 Posts
Judging from my family, the working gun would be the Smith & Wesson model 10. My Grandfather had one, my Father had one, my Uncle had one and I had one. Now my neighbor has all of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,210 Posts
My "go to" revolver is the High Standard Double Nine bought a long time ago and used for the very reasons mentioned. Somewhat compact,versatile, accurate with a six inch barrel yet very affordable, comfortable in a shoulder holster. With a nine shot cylinder I can keep two snake shots cued up for rattlers, warning shots, non-fatal accidental discharges, etc while still having seven real rounds at hand. A good tool, not a showpiece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,344 Posts
Judging from my family, the working gun would be the Smith & Wesson model 10. My Grandfather had one, my Father had one, my Uncle had one and I had one. Now my neighbor has all of them.
Odd. My neighbor says the same thing???


Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
DSCN0283.JPG My K frame is the working one, the J frame is the concealed carry in 357mag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Those old model 10's were indeed working guns. Service guns. Lots of them out there. The Air Force SPs were still using them (Model 10's) into the 80's and maybe beyond but my knowledge ends in the early 80's. In fact I would venture to say that is the revolver Hoot speaks of when he refers to his Military Police service. The K frames and the J frames are stellar weapons. But there is a distinction between a "working gun" and a "working man's gun". The cost of those Smiths could have fed a poor family for a very long time. Colts, Smiths, and the like may be superlative "working guns" (heck, not may be...are) but they were never in the price range of a "working man's gun". Just like Buck knives never shared a price point with the old Utica and Imperial knives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,421 Posts
I remember when I bought the model 10 and the model 36. I wanted the Colt's but they were quite a bit more money. The Colt Detective Special at the time was $100 more than the Smith model 36, might as well have been a million from where I was standing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
In college I shot a fixed sight Model 10 on a team called the "Barnsiders", it was mechanically sound, showed lots of holster wear like a lot of old 10's did. I think I paid $65.00 for it. Made a decent defense gun with the old Skeeter Skelton loads...hollow base wadcutters loaded backwards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,210 Posts
Jeez, anyone re-load here anymore? I haven't heard of the reverse wadcutter load in many a year. I used to be able to work up some loads on weeknights then test them next day after work back when I had too much time on my hands and lots of shooting range. Powder, primers and bullets were cheap, like the firearm I shot them from. Everything seems so dear these days. I miss the .45colt I had to arm-twist my buddy/ workmate/ instructor pilot to buy off me for $75 including holster and a box of ammo. Oh for a time machine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,210 Posts
Can a guy still find Linotype? I always opted for off the shelf Sierra bullets since I was not on that tight a budget. In the .41 170gr hollow points for varmints and plinking, 220gr silhouette jacketed solids for long range handgun fun and bravery in bear country. Fun was an illegal desert dump site shooting for gallon paint cans at ~100 yards and larger (5gal.?) Freon tanks ~150 to 200 yards out.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
1 - 20 of 76 Posts
Top