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Discussion Starter #1
So this thing looks like a great bike and would like to have one along with my tdub . Yamaha I think is missing the bandwagon here in the us 650 cc class look at the klr how many of those things do you see ...lots . Im sure it would be more expensive than a KLR but probably money well spent. What y'all think ?
 

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Wonder if that's the same motor as the Grizzly 660 ATV.
 

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Not sure. Maybe Yamaha feels it would steals sales from the WR250R in the US market and that it would therefore be counterproductive?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure. Maybe Yamaha feels it would steals sales from the WR250R in the US market and that it would therefore be counterproductive?
I thought that as well but the wr is more just a dirt bike or motocross with head light and turn signals and the tenere is adventure dual sport . I think they have room for it in there lineup.
 

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If sales dictated a demand for smaller bikes here in the States then you can rest assured they would be here.
There's more money to be made selling giant 1200cc bikes with more power than is ever needed and it's
what people seem to want based on sales. In the rest of the world, a 250cc bike is considered a medium sized bike.
Here, trying buying anything smaller that's street legal. Been that way for a long long time but does appear the tide may be changing
thanks to expensive fuel.
 

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I would say that consumer opinion is definitely changing to be more appreciative of smaller engines in the U.S. I think market research may be a little bit behind in that regard. In the late nineties and early two thousands, the average sport biker would probably have been inclined to think that someone on a Ninja 250, for example, was a dorky loser because he didn't get a "real man's bike" (1000cc). Whereas now I would say the 300 (ish) cc class is being heartily embraced by young U.S. consumers, and more people are coming to the logical conclusions that 200 horsepower is unfortunately just not at all usable in the real world with speed limits and cops enforcing them. That doesn't mean you should never buy a liter bike; if it makes you happy, by all means get one. Personally I still love liter bikes, but I see them more as fantasies now than usable toys. The distinction being if you have the money to actually take one to the track, in which case they are very much usable.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Maby if the Honda African twin does well with sales in th U.S. we will see the Yamaha 660 xtz tenere here in the United States.
 

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I don't think we're really missing that much by not getting the 660 here, we have plenty of options for getting shaken silly riding big thumpers down America's highways.

Now, a similar package wrapped around the twin from the FZ-07 would be a very welcome addition to the US market!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Silly big thumpers it may be but can't see myself on a KLR !! I like my tdub and wouldn't part with it . I just would like something more 2 up comfortable thats still off road worthy.
 

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I just would like something more 2 up comfortable thats still off road worthy.
The KLR is neither.

That's exactly what I wanted one for, and I was sorely disappointed. I'm afraid that the 660 would just me more of the same.
 

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I'm gonna step in and point out that the Suzuki DR650 is only 366 lbs WET. That's 70 lbs less than the current KLR. The 401 weight on Wikipedia is likely aimed at the previous-gen KLR, that used to be much closer to the DR650 in performance and appearance.

IMO the only bikes worth considering above the DR650, if you want actual off-road capability, is the Tiger 800XC (470 wet) and the KTM 1190 Adventure (505 wet).
 

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So what didn't you like about klr in a 2 up perspective ?
Flat seat that puts your pillion on essentially an even level with you. The 660 looks better in this perspective, but still a 1-piece seat.

Brakes and Suspension that aren't really up to the task 2-up. Once again, the 660 looks to be marginally better but still not comparable to a big ADV bike.

The KLR is notoriously top-heavy, a passenger makes it even worse.

The 650 thumper engine is working very hard at highway speeds riding solo, 2-up it's working even harder and feels positively anemic. A struggling thumper sends bone-jarring vibrations through pilot and pillion alike, causing fatigue very early and seriously diminishing the enjoyment of the ride. Combine that with suspension and brakes that are close to their limit and 2-up touring starts to feel like work instead of fun.

I grew to hate my KLR for touring even solo in large part because of that hammering single. Any poly-cylinder bike is a better choice for long rides.

The TW isn't great 2-up on the highway for the same reasons, but around town the TW is much better at 2-up than the KLR was, in large part thanks to a much lower center of gravity.

I think the tire size helps too. 21/18 wheels really are probably the best for dirt, but I didn't like them on the highway even solo. The TW always felt more planted than the KLR at similar speeds. My Trump on 19/17 wheels feels like it's on rails well into the triple digits. 21/18 wheels on a dual-purpose bike that's too heavy to be ridden aggressively (by most people, anyway) off-pavement seems like a waste. The KTM 990 had the chops to use those skinny tires in the dirt, but even team orange has moved to adv wheels on their big enduros.

There's more, but ultimately it comes down to choosing the right tool for the job. In a pinch you can use all sorts of bikes for all sorts of things, but the KLR seems to offer dirt bike performance on the street and street bike performance on the dirt. Riding 2-up just highlights all of the KLR's shortcomings. A lot of poly-cylinder ADV bikes seem offer a better balance.

Meh, my $0.02
 

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Personally I'm not really a fan of the lastest KTM ADV monsters. I think the 990 was plenty huge enough for round the world crap, but still reasonable enough in size and weight to actually get used off road. One bike that I personally really miss, from BMW, is the HP2 Enduro. I liked to call it the mega-enduro. Reliable and durable motor with 105 horsepower and 75 foot pounds of torque, in a package that weighs less than a KLR 650 - that's my kind of adventure bike! Basically a monstrous beast trying to be a motocrosser :)

http://www.roadsmile.com/images/bmw-hp2-enduro_key_17.jpg
 
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